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Monthly Archives: August 2016

KN, p.179 “Kerrian’s Favorite Gluten Free Pancakes”

 

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Sheila and I really enjoy eating pancakes on the weekends, and even sometimes during the week for dinner. But then, who doesn’t like breakfast for dinner? One of our friends has started a gluten-free diet and asked Sheila if she had a gluten-free version of our pancakes. We didn’t at the time, but Sheila played around with the basic eggs, flour, milk, and butter recipe and came up with this one. We tried pea flour, but that batch wound up tasting like hummus.

 

There was lots of taste testing and I think the final version is pretty good served with butter and syrup. They are thin, not puffy.

 

An interesting discovery was that these can become a bread substitute by adding rosemary or other herbs to the mix. They don’t really stand up to a hefty sandwich, but work nicely as a substitute for rolls with dinner.

 

Kerrian's Favorite Gluten Free Pancakes
Author: 
Recipe type: Breakfast
Cuisine: Gluten-Free
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: Serves 4
 
Ingredients
  • ½ cup tapioca flour
  • ½ cup white rice flour
  • 1 ½ cups brown rice flour
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 2 cups cold water
  • ¼ cup almond oil
  • 1 teaspoon pure Mexican vanilla
  • 1 egg (can also be just the egg white)
  • 1 tablespoon softened margarine for coating frying pan – (butter will burn)
Instructions
  1. Mix all dry ingredients together.
  2. Slowly add water while whisking to keep the mixture from clumping.
  3. Add almond oil and whisk until thoroughly mixed.
  4. Add vanilla and whisk until blended.
  5. Add egg and whisk until mixed.
  6. Heat frying pan on medium, add margarine and spread to cover bottom of pan. As soon as margarine starts to bubble, begin to make pancakes.
  7. Flip when pancake edges begin to dry and surface bubbles.
  8. Done when lightly browned on both sides, about a minute or two each side, depending on the heat of your stovetop.
  9. Remove to plate and serve immediately.
  10. Making the herb-seasoned variety? Add a teaspoon of dried rosemary or other herbs to the dry ingredients. Prep and cooking is the same.
 

Recipe tips:

This gluten free batter should be stirred just before cooking each batch, since the rice flour tends to sink to the bottom of the bowl.

Can be reheated in toaster.

Can be frozen, but separate each with foil before putting in freezer containers.

If left in pile on covered plate in refrigerator, can be kept for four days.

 

Enjoy!  🙂

*Photo by Patti Phillips

 

 

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KN, p. 178 “Is the builder dead yet?”

 

“What? Is somebody trying to kill the builder?” you ask.

They’ might be thinking about it. As in, more than one person is annoyed.

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Here’s what is happening. When we moved in, the neighborhood was full of wooded lots. Even the properties with houses already there, had plenty of trees at the edges, along the fences, or next to the houses. Some were mature trees that had been left on the otherwise cleared lots before construction had begun. Property owners added flowering trees as time passed. Wildlife flourishes in this residential neighborhood of 1/4 and 1/3 acre lots. We’re not out in the country, but these are not zero-lot homes either.

 

Phases 1 and 2 of the larger housing development have long been completed. Phase 3 was finished three years ago, the original trees are beautiful, and the owners are adding new fruit/flowering trees each year.

 

Enter Phase 4. The original developer had a few lots left and found a builder to buy them. That builder wanted the lots cleared before finalizing the deal. That’s when we, the neighbors, discovered that some of the grassy/lightly-wooded areas between existing homes were actually unsold lots.

 

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ALL of the trees from those lots are being cleared, lots of red dirt remains, and now mudslides into neighboring backyards are expected with the next heavy rain.

 

The developer in charge of the work told me on the phone that the lots are not wide enough to have left the trees in place. The one in the photos is 60 feet wide. Years ago, I lived in a house surrounded by maples and evergreens. That lot was 50×100. IMO, this guy simply did not want to take the time to leave a couple of trees to shade the house and protect the wildlife on the lot.

 

The neighbors to the left and right of the bulldozer photo were concerned enough to have the City Inspector come out to assess the situation. Note the dirt to the left appears to be in a pile that crosses the property line and would be the most likely to slide into the neighbor’s yard in the rain.

 

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The builder’s solution was to place sand barrier ‘fencing’ on the property line. The bulldozer operator moved the dirt up against it.

 

Other lots have similar problems with soil grading and tree removal.

 

Heated conversations have been held. The neighborhood grapevine is operating at peak efficiency. Town council meetings are scheduled on the topic.

 

In case you doubt that neighbors and builders would actually get angry over something like this, read on.

 

Existing homeowners in Colorado were upset with new builders in the neighborhood who appeared to be putting in homes that did not conform to the look of the development, thereby lowering everyone’s property values. Building was delayed while plans were reviewed. Board members who were in charge of approving the designs (but didn’t) were removed from their positions and new people replaced them.

 

http://www.reporterherald.com/ci_20492538/homeowners-builder-bank-at-odds-lovelands-taft-farms

 

When developers with big money at stake and disgruntled homeowners with possible deflated property values are at odds, tempers can flare, injunctions can occur, and nothing good happens. If the builder complies with city ordinances, there is little recourse for the neighbors who don’t care for the look of the newer houses, or how the new homes will affect them.

 

City codes exist for a reason. Check yours out. You might be surprised at what is NOT included in some communities, such as: building setbacks, curbing pets, rules about garbage, home swimming pool regulations, livestock allowed in the city limits, etc.

 

We haven’t seen any bodies in the remaining woods yet, but it is still early in the process. Kidding. Tempers are high, but so far, everybody is just at the yelling stage. Let’s hope that reason prevails and the builder corrects the problems he has created, then doesn’t produce any new ones.

 

*Photos by Patti Phillips

 

 

 

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KN, p. 177 “Did she die of heatstroke?”

 

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It’s no secret that we’ve been doing a LOT of digging in the gardens this summer. The work can get hot and steamy, so we tend to start early in the morning. It’s not as humid and the bugs aren’t swarming in full force yet. Yesterday, I was delayed getting out there, so before I realized it, the sun was high in the sky, it was 95 degrees, I was really hot, and I was sweating something fierce.

 

And, suddenly thirsty. I was even a little dizzy and felt a headache coming on. As soon as I figured out what was happening, I dropped the tools and got myself inside. Sheila saw me ditch the shovel and headed in as well. I grabbed a cold, wet towel for my neck and she handed me some water. There was some scowling, but the crisis was averted.

 

What had happened? The heat got too much for me and I needed a tall, cool glass of water. I had left my golf cap inside, along with my bottle of water and my golf bandana, and I was paying for it. It didn’t get as far as heatstroke, but if I’d been at the golf course or the beach, and not 15 seconds from help, it could have.

 

The Mayo Clinic defines heatstroke:

 

“Heatstroke is a condition caused by your body overheating, usually as a result of prolonged exposure to or physical exertion in high temperatures. This most serious form of heat injury, heatstroke can occur if your body temperature rises to 104 F (40 C) or higher. Heatstroke requires emergency treatment.”

 

In the summertime, when temperatures reach in the high 90s on a regular basis, we will normally feel hot outdoors, so how do we know that there is a problem? Athletes, moms, dads, dogs, babies – everyone is vulnerable to heat stroke and we need to be aware of the symptoms.

 

Symptoms of Heat Stroke

Nobody I know carries around a thermometer, so aside from the high body core temp, symptoms can include:

  • Nasty headache
  • Dizziness
  • Lack of sweating
  • Red, hot, and dry skin
  • Muscle weakness or cramps
  • Nausea
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Trouble breathing
  • Disorientation, or staggering

 

 

How do we prevent things from getting to that point? Especially if you or your friends are planning to be out hiking, working, or camping in the heat, far away from speedy help?

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Preventing Heat Stroke

 

  • Wear lightweight, loose-fitting clothing, and a hat.
  • Use a sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 30 or more.
  • Drink water – a half ounce for each pound of body weight – if you weigh 150 pounds, you should be drinking 75 ounces of water – and that’s on a regular day with no exercise or extra heat involved.
  • Increase that amount if it’s hot outside or you are working/exercising outside.
  • Drink an extra bottle of water an hour before exercise, then during exercise, drink another 8 ounces of water every half hour, even if you don’t feel thirsty.
  • Shift your outdoor activities to the coolest times of the day, either early morning or after the sun goes down if you can. If not, make sure to follow the rest of the suggestions.

 

 

People die from heat stroke. That’s why we are warned not to leave children and pets in hot cars. When it’s hot outside, the heat in the car gets magnified by the windows, resulting in temperatures that can be 30 degrees hotter inside the car – a disaster waiting to happen.

 

Sporting events are times where people get caught up in the competition and forget to hydrate, sometimes with tragic consequences. At the time the article below was published, the softball player’s death was unexplained, but later pointed to heatstroke. What do you think?

http://weartv.com/news/local/questions-of-heat-stroke-raised-after-preteens-death

 

I always pack a bandana or ‘cold collar’ in my golf bag, wear a hat on the course, and take plenty of water with me. I got careless at the house, but that won’t happen again.

 

For additional information:

https://www.drugs.com/health-guide/heat-stroke-hyperthermia.html

 

*Photos by Patti Phillips

 

 

 

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