Visiting Detectives

Visiting Detective Becki Green – “Mediterranean Potato Salad”

 

VisitingDetectiveBGMeditPotSalad copy

Remember Becki Green, the Visiting Detective that brought us the yummy brownies and then gave us the recipe? She and her sleuthing partner, Gina Monroe, took a few days off after solving their latest case and stopped in to say hello. We chatted about the success of the first book they co-wrote, “A Purse to Die For,” a really fun mystery, and the newly released second book, “A Killer Necklace,” even better than the first. Then we switched to another topic dear to Becki’s heart.

 

Becki is a vegetarian (no meat, fish or chicken in the diet and sometimes no milk or eggs) and is working toward becoming a vegan (no milk or eggs at all, not even as an ingredient in a dish). She has a great website that showcases her favorite vegetarian recipes, www.vegetariandetective.blogspot.com

 

Here’s Becki, making veggie food fun:

“I think eating veggie is mainstream these days. Everyone knows that it’s good for health, great for the environment and AWESOME for animals. My goal is to glam it up!”

 

Mediterranean Potato Salad

(No mayonnaise, no eggs, ultra-safe to take on picnics, and vibrant with fresh, summer-garden herbs.

Ingredients:
24 baby red potatoes, the larger ones halved
2 tablespoons olive oil
3 tablespoons lemon juice
salt
pepper
1/2 cup finely chopped red onion
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 cup chopped fresh parsley
1/2 cup chopped fresh mint

 

Preparation:
Preheat oven to 400ºF.

Spread the potatoes on a 9″ X 13″ pan.

Drizzle with the olive oil and toss to coat the potatoes.

Roast for 30 min. (If it’s way too hot outside to want to turn on your oven, or you want to speed up the process, prick the potatoes with a fork and microwave them in a covered casserole dish for 10 min. on high, stirring at intervals, then drain and continue as below, except you probably don’t have to transfer the potatoes to a large bowl.)

Transfer the potatoes to a large bowl and sprinkle with the lemon juice. Salt and pepper to taste.
Let cool.
Toss in the rest of the ingredients and chill.

Serves 4-8.

 

Trust me. Sheila and I wouldn’t steer you wrong about food. This one is a keeper. 😀

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

Thanks to Cynthia St-Pierre for stopping by, the real-life good friend and writer who has been educating me about the values of going vegan. Don’t forget to check out her two mysteries, co-written with Melodie Campbell. You’ll find hi-fashion, a little vegetarian chat, some romance, and great mysteries to solve.

VisitingDetectiveBeckiGreenCYNTHIA 2015

CYNTHIA ST-PIERRE

vegetariandetective.blogspot.com

fashionationwithmystery.com

twitter.com/stpierrecynthia

google.com/+CynthiaStPierre

Member, Crime Writers of Canada and

International Thriller Writers

 

VisitingDetectiveBG-A Purse to Die For

http://viewBook.at/B008IKA022

 

VisitingDetectiveBG-A Killer Necklace

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://getBook.at/B0161QKW2C

 

 

 

 

Photos and cover images: courtesy of Cynthia St-Pierre.

 

 

 

Visiting Detective Lexi Sobado – “Every Day Carry (EDC) for Police”

 

VisitingDetective-LexiPuzzle

Lexi Sobado and I crossed professional paths again while I was working a case that required a bit of psychic know-how. Lexi grew up in Washington D.C. and has special out-of-the-box thinking that earned her a job as a Puzzler for Iniquus. She solves the crimes that put American interests at risk. Known as Lynx on the job, Lexi works with a team, Strike Force, led by the man in Lexi’s life, Striker Rheas.

 

She had come up from D.C. on a case of her own and Sheila and I put her up for the night. We laughed, shared the usual war stories of law enforcement – the “my gal was badder than your guy” kind. And, then we talked shop for a bit.

 

My police department was stuck. We couldn’t find a suspect and the trail had run cold. We had solid evidence pointing to him, but he got away before we could arrest him. The case involved a missing husband worth big bucks, ransom money and a frantic family. Enter Lexi. In between munching on one of Sheila’s chocolate muffins, Lexi redirected my thinking on the husband. I’m happy to say that we found the hubby less than a day later. Turns out that the husband was running a scam and wasn’t missing at all. He was hiding out with his new girlfriend and the suspect we had been chasing was in on it. What a pair of bums! I doubt that the wife will be weeping for him while he does his stint in prison.

 

Lexi has been following Kerrian’s Notebook and she pointed out that I’ve never posted the basic gear that a cop carries around. My bad. So here is Lexi’s contribution to the site. Thanks, Lexi, for filling in a gap for us. 🙂

 

Duty Belt

Disadvantages

  • Weight – upward of 30 lbs. (think one-year-old baby) many of the belts are made of leather, though modern uniforms often use nylon to be lighter and washable (think body fluids). 
  • Gravity – with all of that weight, the belt wants to slip down. “Belt keepers” circle the duty belt sometimes referred to as a Sam Browne, to hold it snugly to the officer’s dress belt. These are snapped into place.

Advantage – 

  • Having equipment at the handy.

Typical EDC (every day carry)

  • Pepper Spray
  • Semi-automatic pistol in a security holster
  • Magazines (clips)  
  • Phone
  • Flashlight
  • Mini-flashlight (typical preparedness saying “One is none and Two is one.”)
  • Asp
  • Portable radio
  • Taser
  • Handcuffs 
  • Handcuff keys
  • Zip ties
  • Glove pouch (latex)
  • Bullet resistant vest (required by some jurisdictions adds about 5 lbs to the already 10-15 lb duty belt)
  • By individual discretion – back up gun (police personal gun often in an ankle holster)
  • By individual discretion knife/utility tool such as a Swiss Army knife or Leatherman.
  • By individual discretion a kubotan

 

The Patrol Vehicle

CruiserInteriorDSC_2259

 

  • Mode of transportation
  • Mobile office
  • Equipment storage

 

 CruiserInteriorComputerDSC_2255_2

 

 

Modifications might include:

CruiserInteriorShotgunDSC_2258

  • Push bumpers 
  • Rifle mounts
  • Prisoner partitions
  • Specialized locking systems
  • Wiring systems which support the add ons
  • Hidden lighting systems
  • Bar lights
  • Weapons lockboxes
  • Camera equipment
  • Sirens
  • Radio equipment
  • Computer terminals (called MDT for Mobile Data Terminal)
  • For officer safety, the light that usually comes on when opening the door is often disconnected.

 

In the Trunk of the Patrol Vehicle:

  • Fire extinguishers
  • First Aid Kit
  • Shotgun 
  • Gas mask/protective suit
  • AEDs or Automatic External Defibrillator (at around $1200 these are slow to getting in each vehicle)
  • Traffic cones
  • Flares
  • Flotation devices
  • Rechargeable flashlight
  • Snow chains

 

Other Equipment might include:

  • Radar 
  • Alco-Sensor (for initial analysis of blood alcohol levels)
  • Tint meter
  • Ballistic shield
  • Pepperball gun – this shoots round pellets (like paintball pellets) filled with a powder form of pepper spray. Shot at the feet the powder will spray up to disperse a crowd; hit in the chest of an aggressor or suicidal person it gives the officers time to take non-lethal action.

 

Thanks, Lexi! Have a safe trip home. Don’t eat all the muffins at once. 😉

 ~~~~~~~

Many thanks to Fiona Quinn for visiting with us again at Kerrian’s Notebook and sharing the great list of every day equipment a law enforcement officer might use. She’s one of our favorite people, so please check out her website, connect with her on social media, and buy her books.  🙂FionaQuinnFiona Quinn is the creator of the Lynx Series, featuring Lexi Sobado.

VisitingDetectiveLexi4Books

Fiona Quinn Books

Fiona Quinn writes Smart Sexy Suspense.

The series is available on Amazon, along with the other books and short stories she has written.

Please visit http://www.fionaquinnbooks.com/ for more information about Fiona.

Her fascinating blog can be found at www.thrillwriting.blogspot.com

Want to connect on Twitter? @fionaquinnbooks

 

*Photo credits:

Patti Phillips – interior cruiser shots

Wikipedia and Fiona’s website – all others

 

 

 

 

Visiting Detectives – Sheriff Will Denton

 

 

It’s no secret that I’m a Gettysburg/Civil War buff.  The local bookstore got a new title in, “Last Stand at Bitter Creek,” written by Tom Rizzo, who seems to share my interest in 19th century law enforcement. As I read his tale of a Sheriff back in that era, I began to imagine what it would be like to sit down and chat with that Sheriff about a case.

 

Meet Sheriff Will Denton.

 

 

 

Sheriff Will Denton leaned back in the chair and stretched his legs in front of him, which gave him a little relief from the pain. A constant reminder that no one can outrun a bullet. He flashed a tired smile at Charlie Kerrian, and wondered how many other lawmen, or detectives, sought this man’s counsel.

 

Denton occupied the middle ground between the mid-forties and mid-fifties, his face a pattern of deep lines reflecting his experience and competence. His laid-back demeanor wasn’t accidental. It served the purpose of luring most bad eggs he confronted into a false sense of comfort. He wore his holster low and strapped down, the sign of someone who meant business.

 

“So here’s my problem. I got this railroad detective coming who thinks someone he’s hunting is holed up in my town. But I hear he’s a trigger-happy hothead. I don’t want the folks nervous, scared or edgy in anyway, and I’m trying to figure out how best to handle this.”

 

Kerrian took a sip of coffee from the mug he was holding and swallowed.

 

“From my understanding, Sheriff Denton, you have a reputation of being able to handle anything that comes your way. So, why seek input from me on this particular occasion?”

 

Denton hadn’t realized Kerrian knew anything about him. He admired his thoroughness. “Truth is, I’ve never enjoyed the luxury of talking things out with anyone. The town can’t afford to hire me a deputy. The only ones I ever confide in about anything are Hiram who owns the livery. He does a good job as my unofficial eyes and ears since I spend so much time roamin’ the countryside. And, I share my concerns on occasion with Ms. Brennan, who runs a local tavern.”

 

Denton, absent-mindedly slid his hand back to the handle of the Peacemaker he wore, making sure the small leather strip at the back of his holster was still looped over the hammer to keep it in place.

 

“I make it a point to learn everything about strangers who visit our fine town—even if they wear a badge,” Denton said. “Hotheads make me nervous. The last one I confronted put a bullet in my thigh.”

 

“And, what happened to him?”

 

Denton frowned. “He’s pretty much dead.”

 

“I have a feeling strangers who visit your town don’t stay long, Sheriff.”

 

Denton’s green eyes flickered with amusement. “We’ve had our share of roustabouts with the war ending. I tend to be an impatient sort when it comes to trouble. I figure it’s best to head off a problem rather than fix one. But, just the same, it wouldn’t do me or the town much good to have to shoot Mecklin.” He smiled. “That’s the railroad detective.”

 

Kerrian returned the smile. “Why does this man concern you so much?”

 

“From what I’ve heard, he’s quick to take charge. Prides himself on always getting his man.”

 

“Is that so bad?”

 

“Only when the innocent get in the way. He’s always left a few bodies between him and the man’s he’s hunting. No one has ever called his hand. Seems to have free rein wherever he goes.”

 

“Why?”

 

“It’s all about accommodation. The railroad pretty much calls the shots in small towns like ours. Money talks,” Denton said, lifting his hand to the side of his face and rubbing his thumb back-and-forth against the tips of his four fingers. “If your town’s lucky enough to be touched by the magic wand of the iron rail, it can’t help but grow.”

 

“And?” Kerrian said, squinting at his visitor.

 

“And, if the railroad decides to pull up stakes and leave, bad things happen. Those places just die up. They wither away. Become ghost towns. We fought long and hard to attract the railroad. Mecklin is the lead detective, with a long record of success and he pretty much can do what he wants because he has brought bad people to justice and recovered thousands of dollars in stolen gold.”

 

“What’s your end game, sheriff?”

 

“I don’t want him turned loose to do as he pleases.”

 

“So, don’t let him.”

 

“Easier said than done, Detective Kerrian. The town council has pretty much told me to butt out. Or, if I do butt in, to let Mecklin call the shots and not interfere in a way that puts the town at risk of looking uncooperative in the eyes of the railroad.”

 

Kerrian didn’t say anything, and closed his eyes. Seconds later, he opened one eyelid and squinted, and then opened the second one, seeming to bring Denton into sharp focus. The movement of the eyelids reminded Denton of a couple of windows opening.

 

“My intuition tells me you’re not going to allow Mr. Mecklin to have his way, no matter what the risk. No matter what the consequences.”

 

“Is that your advice?”

 

“You don’t need advice, sheriff. You just needed to hear the words out loud.”

 

A smile played on Will Denton’s lips.

 

“Reckon you’re right about that, Detective. My town. My rules.

 

A door to another room opened, and a gentle-looking woman smiled at Denton, and nodded to her husband, who glanced at his pocket watch.

 

“Will, we’d like you to join us for a home-cooked meal and a glass of sweet tea. And, one of Sheila’s wonderful desserts, of course.  Would you do us the honor?”

 

Denton stood up, unbuckled the gun belt, and draped it over the arm of the chair. 

 

“Best offer I’ve had today, Charlie.”

 

# # #

Thanks to Will Denton (aka Tom Rizzo) for stopping by Kerrian’s Notebook and giving us a glimpse into the life of a cop from another century. If you have any questions for Tom, please leave them in the comments. Tom posts some great articles about the West, so be sure to look for him online.

 

About the Author:

A passion for 19th century American history, Tom’s debut novel—LAST STAND AT BITTER CREEK—includes several elements of historical fact. The novel was a finalist for the Western Fictioneers Peacemaker Award for Best Western First Novel.

 

His second book is entitled HEROES & ROGUES: THE GOOD & THE BAD OF THE AMERICAN WEST.

 

His writing journey has taken him from radio and television news reporting to the Associated Press, where he worked as a correspondent, followed by several years in advertising and public relations.

 

He grew up in central Ohio, lived in Great Britain for several years, and now calls Houston, Texas, home.

 

Tom is a member of Western Writers of America, Wild West History Association, and Western Fictioneers.

Contact Info

Blog:          http://tomrizzo.com/ 

Facebook:  http://www.facebook.com/TomRizzoWrites

Twitter:      http://twitter.com/TomRizzoWrites     

Email:       Tom@TomRizzo.com

 

 

 

 

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